WorkLife

Our thoughts on the world of employment law - and beyond.

Ballot paper test case: Thomas Cook Airlines Limited vs British Air Line Pilots’ Association

Ballot paper test case: Thomas Cook Airlines Limited vs British Air Line Pilots’ Association

As readers will be aware, an employer is prevented from (i) suing a trade union for inducing members to breach their contracts by striking and (ii) (to a more limited degree) from dismissing striking employees, provided the strike action has been called in accordance with strict conditions laid out within the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 (“TULRCA”). Given the immunities provided within the Act, it is very important that the trade union does abide by these strict...

Discrimination: injury to feeling awards and how to avoid them

Discrimination: injury to feeling awards and how to avoid them

In discrimination claims, successful claimants are entitled to potentially uncapped compensation, which is where the big numbers you sometimes see in newspaper headlines come from (“Top woman doctor’s record £4.5m payout for five-year campaign of harassment”, “City boss sues for £1m over claims of ‘unrelenting homophobic abuse”, etc). 

Bosses CAN’T snoop through your emails

Bosses CAN’T snoop through your emails

Early last year, I wrote an article about a privacy case decided by the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR).  The case itself was not particularly interesting.  The newspaper coverage however, was astonishing with front pages screaming “Your boss can now read EVERY Facebook and WhatsApp message you send at WORK”. 

Suspension: not such a neutral act?

Suspension: not such a neutral act?

The recent case of Agoreyo v London Borough of Lambeth highlights the need for employers to think carefully before suspending an employee who is the subject of disciplinary allegations, and not just do so automatically.  This is the case even where the allegations against the employee are extremely serious.