WorkLife: Whistleblowing

Our thoughts on the world of employment law - and beyond.

Employers beware: the 'public interest' hurdle in whistleblowing is seemingly low

Employers beware: the 'public interest' hurdle in whistleblowing is seemingly low

If it's not a case on the gig economy making the employment news headlines, it's one on whistleblowing.  And this month is no exception, with the Court of Appeal handing down its decision in Chesterton v Nurmohamed.  In a judgment that is undeniably a blow for employers, the Court has considered what it means for a disclosure to be 'in the public interest' and in doing so has set the bar low.

Whistleblowing – where next?

Whistleblowing – where next?

I’ve struggled with various elements of the whistleblowing legislation and its interpretation over the years; the requirement for the disclosure to be made in good faith/in the public interest, whether a complaint about a breach of one’s own employment contract can be a protected disclosure etc. Every so often, I read a whistleblowing case report which makes sense to me so I thought I’d share my thoughts.

Don’t shoot the messenger: whistleblowing in financial services

Don’t shoot the messenger: whistleblowing in financial services

Recent press reports in relation to Barclays’ Chief Executive, Jes Staley’s, attempts to uncover the identity of an internal whistleblower have again brought the issue of whistleblowing protections within the financial services’ sector to the fore.

New whistleblowing rules in financial services

New whistleblowing rules in financial services

A package of reforms introduced by the Financial Conduct Authority encouraging whistleblowing in financial services came into effect last week. The rules aim to encourage a culture where individuals feel able to raise concerns and challenge poor practice and behaviour ,and have been introduced in response to huge public criticism of the culture within banking including various scandals, such as LIBOR and forex.

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