WorkLife: Whistleblowing

Our thoughts on the world of employment law - and beyond.

From Unison to whistleblowing – reasons why 2017 is worth remembering

From Unison to whistleblowing – reasons why 2017 is worth remembering

Now that January has finally limped to the finish line, you could be forgiven for feeling that 2017 was a long time ago.  However, before your memories fade altogether, I thought it would be a helpful reminder to look at some of the key employment matters from last year which are likely to continue to have an impact in 2018, as well as consider some of the new developments which this year may bring. 

Whistleblowing and the mind-set of the decision-maker

Whistleblowing and the mind-set of the decision-maker

The recent Court of Appeal case of The Royal Mail -v- Jhuti gives guidance for employers when reaching decisions to dismiss employees in circumstances where the employee has in the past raised protected disclosures. 

Employers beware: the 'public interest' hurdle in whistleblowing is seemingly low

Employers beware: the 'public interest' hurdle in whistleblowing is seemingly low

If it's not a case on the gig economy making the employment news headlines, it's one on whistleblowing.  And this month is no exception, with the Court of Appeal handing down its decision in Chesterton v Nurmohamed.  In a judgment that is undeniably a blow for employers, the Court has considered what it means for a disclosure to be 'in the public interest' and in doing so has set the bar low.

Whistleblowing – where next?

Whistleblowing – where next?

I’ve struggled with various elements of the whistleblowing legislation and its interpretation over the years; the requirement for the disclosure to be made in good faith/in the public interest, whether a complaint about a breach of one’s own employment contract can be a protected disclosure etc. Every so often, I read a whistleblowing case report which makes sense to me so I thought I’d share my thoughts.

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